HARRY WONG

TO-DO LIST

Master list created by Danny Bergman, UN-L


Summer Before


  • arrange room so that lecture and grouping is possible
  • learn classroom management techniques; what works for you? have these written out and ready to use
  • make sure all furniture and equipment is working properly
  • organize supplies according to usage & monitor availability
  • have an opening-of-class procedure
  • know a grading scale, policy, and system -have a record keeping system in place
  • have a discipline plan accessible and procedures written down for all the students to know
  • have supplies ready to go before D-Day
  • have room arranged so that it's user-friendly-turn in baskets, organized equipment, etc.
  • know your classroom: prepare floor space, work area, student area, wall space, etc.
  • have grading policy/make-up work ready and working
  • lesson plans done for first unit (at least...maybe for first couple units)
  • list the possible misconceptions for each lesson plan, and a list of open ended questions for activities
  • know how to greet the class
  • know school policies
  • plan things for students to do upon arrival into the room (B.U.R.P.)
  • read up on research based procedures
  • set up system for make-up labs (buddy system, folders on wall?)
  • build up own library of activity/lab books for references
  • look on the internet for new ideas
  • obtain the text book, begin making the outline for the year
  • make seating chart
  • continue to prepare the room (pg.97-99 Wong)
  • find a teacher to help you and answer questions for you
  • practice introducing yourself... know what you want to say
  • set aside place to post daily assignments:
  • clean room, set up, decorate room and door, arrange
  • take part in induction process p. 17
  • partner with a mentor
  • "Beg, borrow, steal" p. 18
  • know your district’s curriculum guide and use materials that reflect
  • those objectives (understand your role) p. 22
  • be involved in planning the students’ welcome to school p. 46
  • get a yearbook and learn students’ and colleagues’ faces and names
  • learn you students’ names and their pronunciations
  • "Before you move a single desk" p. 94
  • See pages 95-100 preparing
  • See page 103
  • post info. About yourself and your students p. 109
  • See page 112
  • plan seating assignments and arrangements p. 116-120
  • have the desks arranged so all students’ eyes are on you
  • think and then decide your rules and write them down, post them before school begins p. 143, 147
  • *See page 147: introducing rules
  • know the school and district rules p. 149
  • post your consequences p. 152

The First Days of School
  • greet students *honestly* and with energy
  • begin with a seating chart to facilitate name learning- IMPORTANT
  • have info (policies, outlines, etc) posted or ready to hand out
  • give class the idea that you're a person
  • give them your expectations and rules- class policies
  • have an activity planned to give them a feel for what's ahead
  • first day: don’t do a "fun" activity
  • establish Good Control
  • Know: 1. What you are doing 2. Your classroom procedures 3. Your professional responsibilities
  • positive/High Expectations comes from ATTITUDE
  • both for your students and yourself create a classroom climate
  • celebrate the first day of school p. 46
  • have your name and room # clearly visible on the classroom door
  • along with your personal greeting of welcome p. 107
  • dress appropriately/professionally to model success
  • USE your students’ names and correct pronunciations
  • practice effective classroom management - FROM THE BEGINNING
  • initiate a task-oriented and predictable environment
  • have your classroom ready p. 93-4
  • stress large group organization and student procedures p. 94
  • discuss procedures before the emergency has begun p. 97
  • *See pages 105-120
  • first assignment on first day = interesting, short, easy, and successful
  • *See p. 109 Top and 110
  • Two things important to state: your name and your expectations
  • "Succeeding with your first request." P. 114
  • teach student behaviors: 1)Discipline 2)Procedures 3) Routines p. 141
  • have a hard copy of your plan and follow it (Discipline plans)
  • use specific rules as a new teacher (5 or less)
  • introduce discipline plan on the first day of school p. 147 Post them and give a copy to each student (or have them write it down)
  • See p. 152
  • spend more time discussing consequences than Rules p. 153
  • consequences = Reasonable & Logical p. 155
  • post consequences and rewards p. 164
  • communicate your Discipline Plan effectively (Tell students why the rules are needed) p. 165
  • ESTABLISH PROCEDURES See pages 174-7
  • show examples of your first assignment and test p. 232

The Rest of the Year
  • give assignments with end result in mind (teach for learning)
  • make the students do the work, not you
  • give objectives in assignments
  • never use grades as a punishment
  • test to assess mastery, not to assign grades
  • use master learning (pg. 243 I think)
  • strive to be an Impact Teacher p. 6
  • hone your skills in the 3 characteristics of an effective teacher p.9
  • continually improve yourself: go back to college, etc. p. 14
  • look for more ways to be capable
  • *See pages 18, 20
  • get to know your colleagues
  • Listen, Listen, Listen
  • research and use research-based practices
  • intersperse Q’s throughout the text
  • ask questions DURING a video
  • go to professional meetings
  • family Day p. 49
  • continue to dress appropriately
  • maintain a consistently INVITING stance to your students and colleagues: be intentionally inviting
  • spend time with small children/ in a young classroom to feel excitement
  • use the 5 significant concepts that enhance positive expectations p. 69
  • use the words "please" and "thank you" in dialogue & on papers/tests
  • Smile!
  • Be Caring
  • demonstrate you care & love both implicitly through your body language and explicitly
  • through what you say p. 76
  • practice a controlled, disarmed smile
  • MANAGE your classroom, don’t discipline
  • turn students into interested, well productive learners p. 84
  • plan a variety of activities that are appropriate for learning p. 85
  • have every student involved and cooperating in all these activities
  • *See page 87
  • establish and Maintain a Task-oriented and predictable environment p. 88
  • maximize your proximity to Minimize your problems p. 98
  • protect your reputation and create a positive image p. 102
  • *See p. 110 Box "How to Speak to the Class"
  • seating arrangements take priority over seating assignments p. 116-20
  • post your assignments daily and in the same place p. 121-2
  • the Bell and Teacher do not start the class, the students do p. 125
  • the bell is only a signal to the teacher that the next period will start soon
  • have the students get to work immediately
  • have an assignment available p. 133
  • students take responsibility for their own learning and work p. 124-5
  • do not take role at the very beginning of class p. 127
  • constantly evaluate how the teaching process can be improved
  • take role quickly and quietly, not disturbing the class p. 131
  • grade Record Book See pages 134-40
  • deal with the behavior, not the person
  • consequences p. 152-61
  • discipline with your body, not your mouth p. 164
  • "Praise the Deed; Encourage the Student" p. 183
  • increase amount of time student is working to increase leaning and achievement p. 197
  • teach the value of hard work p. 198
  • manage time to maximize student time and effort
  • the student, not the teacher, must be working in order for learning to take place p. 204
  • make Structured and Precise directions and lessons p. 209, 214
  • students UNCOVER p. 209
  • steps to creating an effective assignment p. 210
  • send assignments home with a weekly newsletter p. 210
  • focus on goals/objectives p. 211 - Teach for accomplishment
  • use effective words in assignment p. 217-9
  • think of Bloom’s taxonomy
  • write assignments and tests at the same time p. 230
  • to teach for accomplishment, use objectives and criterion-referenced tests p. 236
  • learn better techniques that will help students succeed in school and life p. 244
  • structure your lessons for cooperative learning p. *258-61
  • *See pages 301-3,*205 *212 *216
  • how to write a test p. 233-4
  • see pages 242-3, 246, 252
  • Share
  • be a LEADER, CHOOSE, have a CAREER, Become an EDUCATOR
  • take risks p. 304
  • start a 10% Risk Plan p. 306-7
  • try 2-3 new ideas each year
  • keep a list of good resources according to other teachers (videos, activities, books, research, etc)
  • keep a list of effective procedures from personal experience and other teachers'
  • try 2 or 3 new things each year
  • keep a journal of everything you did! lesson plans, rules, procedures,... What works? What doesn’t?
  • attend at least a few extra-curricular events
  • form friendly and working relationships with co-workers
  • be aware of National/local workshops to attend (go, if possible)
  • find one new experience-participate in one "new" thing, educationally related, outside of school
  • evaluate self (overall for the year) and make goals for next
  • evaluate self at the end of each month- know where I've been and how I want to change
  • plan lessons ahead- never leave the building without knowing what you're doing the next day
  • write tests at the same time as assignments (maybe when done teaching a unit, or a tentative test)

Where you can find this..... http://nerds.unl.edu/pages/preser/sec/articles/wonguide.html